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extensions

Class A – General extensions

The General Permitted Development Order (GPDO) allows for extensions to be built on many homes without the need for any planning. The phrase used is the enlargement, improvement or other alteration of a dwelling house. Needless to say there are a few restrictions, which we will cover in this article.  Despite not requiring planning, you will require building regs.

All these permissions are contained within Part 1 of the GPDO and apply only to C3 houses. There have been appeals where these permissions have been permitted after appeal on HMOs, so tread carefully if that is your plan. Before starting work check to see if there any conditions that have been placed on your property. These are quite common on new build properties or maybe as a result of a previous planning approval. In those cases full planning permission might be required relevant to that condition or restriction.

Once you have built your extension enjoy it or you can choose to submit an optional application for a Lawful Development Certificate (LDC) which might be useful when you come to sell the property.

 

Where else can’t we benefit?

These permissions do not apply to flats or maisonettes. Nor do they apply to houses that have been converted from agricultural buildings, storage, light industrial, shops or casinos. They do however apply to houses (not flats) converted from offices under Class O. There are also restrictions of the building is listed, in a conservation area, AONB, Broads or Heritage site. They might also have been removed as a result of an Article 4 or a condition on a previous planning application. Finally extensions are to the original building or as it was on 1st July 1948. In other words you can’t extend an extension if it exceeds the limits at the time of building of the property or as it stood on 1st July 1948 if older. If the extension was built prior to 1948, then you can extend it again.

 

You have said where we can’t – so what can we do?

Glad you asked!  The answer depends as to whether you have a detached or a semi-detached/terraced house. Also refer to the technical guidance issued by the Government. But let’s go through each type of extension in turn…….

Rear Extensions

Single Storey
– up to 3m depth for a terrace or semi-detached house
– up to 4m depth for a detached house
– max height of 4m and not higher than the ridge-line of the house
– max eaves height of 3m if within 2m of a boundary and not higher than the eaves of the house
– up to 50% of the original space around the house including any existing outbuildings or sheds etc.
– no cladding on article 2(3) land – conservation area, AONB, Broads
– materials of a similar appearance to existing house
– must not extend beyond a side elevation that fronts a highway or the principal elevation of the original dwelling house
– no verandah, balcony or raised platform
Double Storey
– up to 3m depth on a detached, terrace or semi-detached house
– max eaves height of 3m if within 2m of a boundary and not higher than the eaves of the house
– not higher than the ridge line of the house
– not higher than the eaves of the house
– must be more than 7m to the rear boundary
– up to 50% of the original space around the original dwelling house including any existing outbuildings or sheds etc.
– no cladding on article 2(3) land – conservation area, AONB, Broads
– not on article 2(3) land – conservation area, AONB, Broads
– materials of a similar appearance to existing house
– upper floor side-windows obscure glass and non-opening
– pitch of roof same as original house
– must not extend beyond a side elevation that fronts a highway or the principal elevation of the original dwelling house
– no verandah, balcony or raised platform

Side Extensions

Single Storey
– max of 50% width of original house
– max height of 4m and not higher than the ridge-line of the house
– max eaves height of 3m if within 2m of a boundary and not higher than the eaves of the house
– up to 50% of the original space around the house including any existing outbuildings or sheds etc.
– no cladding on article 2(3) land – conservation area, AONB, Broads
– materials of a similar appearance to existing house
– not on a side elevation that fronts a highway
– no verandah, balcony or raised platform
Double Storey
– Not allowed – requires planning

 

Larger Rear Extensions

The Larger Rear Extension allows up to an 8m (detached) or a 6m (semi/terrace) extension. Before beginning the development, the developer must notify the local authority by providing “a written description of the proposed development”, “a plan indicating the site and showing the proposed development and any existing enlargement of the original dwellinghouse to which the enlarged part will be joined”, and certain other information. This type of notification is subject to a deadline of 42 days (i.e. 6 weeks). There is no fee for this type of notification. The local authority will write to all neighbours to see if anyone objects. If none of the owners or occupiers of the adjoining premises object to the proposed development, then the local planning authority confirms to the developer that prior approval is not required (or the they fail to issue a decision within 42 days). If anyone objects to the proposed development, then the local authority must assess “the impact of the proposed development on the amenity of any adjoining premises”. They then either grant prior approval (either unconditionally or subject to conditions) or refuses prior approval. Should they refuse or add conditions you have a right of appeal.

As from 19th August 2019 there is a fee to pay of £96 to the local authority.

Single Storey
– between 3m and 6m for a terrace or semi-detached house
– between 4m and 8m for a detached house
– max height of 4m and not higher than the ridge-line of the house
– max eaves height of 3m if within 2m of a boundary and not higher than the eaves of the house
– up to 50% of the original space around the house including any existing outbuildings or sheds etc.
– not on article 2(3) land – conservation area, AONB, Broads or a site of special scientific interest
– materials of a similar appearance to existing house
– must not extend beyond a side elevation that fronts a highway or the principal elevation of the original dwelling house
– no verandah, balcony or raised platform
Double Storey
– not allowed – requires planning or opt for the 3m option above

Despite the various restrictions, you can build quite a large side or rear extension as long as your garden is large enough. The 50% restriction includes any outbuildings, so beware of any garages or large sheds etc.

Updated: 9th May 2019 to remove the previous date of 31st May 2019 for larger rear extensions. 
Updated: 12th August 2019 to reflect the new fee for larger rear extensions.

 

After many requests, we now offer a site appraisal service for just £449. This appraisal will be from a developer's viewpoint letting you know the best options that you might have with your site or building of interest. No point in spending a large amount on professional fees if the deal has large potential issues from a planning aspect. Or maybe we can find new angles that will increase your GDV and potential profit/income! Click here to start the process.

 

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